Steamboat Mountain School Global Immersion Studies Blog

Steamboat Mountain School India 2017

Posted by Marta Miskolczy on Apr 17, 2017 4:35:32 PM

 

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Topics: Colorado high school, India, Student travelers, boarding school with international travel program, Service learning, outdoor education, life beyond college, college prep

Steamboat Mountain School Ecuador 2017

Posted by Marta Miskolczy on Apr 17, 2017 4:23:57 PM
Eric Phalen '17
Hello.  The travel here was quite hectic but we managed and became a team. T his was very valuable to me because I could trust all of the group and have fun. Pero mi Espanol esta mejorando porque yo hablo con muchas personas en Ecuador. During my stay at Mama Hilda hostel, which is a great place, I brought dishes to the kitchen to help out Juan, Mama Hilda y Dardio. Mama Hilda invited me to cook in the morning, so I did. After that, I did yoga and headed back to the kitchen where Mama Hilda and Juan pointed to a bowl with aloe vera plant spikes in it.  I had been wanting to use pure aloe vera gel, which is called sabila en Espanol!  During my stay, I have learned how to cook and the locals have shown me how to use and where daily items are from. I make my own lemongrass tea by just taking it off the tree and boiling it in water. I have also learned how to cook. The food is very good at the homestay; it's all organic and handmade. Today, April 14th, we walked 22 km and got to see the beauty of Ecuador but also understand how hard the people work here. I said today that Ecuadorians work 15 times harder but have 15 times less than Americans. I have also learned how to manage my self and how to work as a group. Things can get difficult, but your attitude is important. Anyways, the trip has been great, and we have much more to come. 
       Gracias,  Eric
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Topics: Colorado high school, Student travelers, boarding school with international travel program, Service learning, life beyond college, college prep, Ecuador, beyond college prep, students learn to cook

Steamboat Mountain School Ecuador 2017

Posted by Marta Miskolczy on Apr 17, 2017 1:57:11 PM
Steamboat Mountain School is thrilled to announce the Global Immersion Studies Program students will spend one month (April, 2017) exploring: Trip 1 Sikkim region of Northern India with faculty leaders Gina Wither and Robbie Tesar. OR Trip 2 High Andes of Ecuador with faculty leaders are Charlie Smith and Kaiti Kinshella.  OR Trip 3 Australia to  work with 2 Aboriginal communities with faculty leaders Margi Missling Root and John Morse.

These amazing travel experiences will help our high school students deepen their understanding of culture and responsible travel.

Here's the first update from Ecuador on April 13!

Tanner Richard '17

The first moments of the trip went by in a blur. Before I knew it, our group met at the school and departed to Denver. We met and ran through logistics before going out for one last American meal. It was hard to believe that it was already the time to leave. We have done everything that we could to prepare for the experience, but it still was a scary thing to leave the country with only our group, baggage, and two leaders . . . We soon arrived in Quito and took a quick bus ride to a hotel for the night. During our ride in the dark, we gazed out at the night scape of Quito and wondered what adventures lay beyond. The next day, we took a spectacular drive to the village of Chugchilan. As we climbed the magnificent Andes mountains, we marveled at the high peaks and low valleys. The sky seemed to meet the Earth in a way that I had never seen before. We soon settled into our rooms in the Mama Hilda hostel and rejeuvinated. Our experience in Ecuador so far has been one that I will never forget, and we have just started the trip! We can only dream of what the next few weeks have in store for us.
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Topics: Colorado high school, Student travelers, boarding school with international travel program, Service learning, life beyond college, college prep, Ecuador

How we broaden students' perspectives through international travel

Posted by Marta Miskolczy on Jan 24, 2017 1:22:53 PM

Foreign travel at the Steamboat Mountain School dates back to 1958. Since the first trip to Mexico, students have visited over fifty-five countries. This strong tradition, combined with an integrated academic curriculum, makes Steamboat Mountain School a unique and exciting place to learn, gain life experience, and develop a world perspective. Spring 2017 will mark the 59th year that the school travels internationally. Each trip will focus on home-stays, service projects, language study, cultural immersion, adventure, and exposure to the host country’s natural and man-made environments. Steamboat Mountain School’s Global Immersion Studies program (GIS) challenges students to broaden their global perspective and deepen their understanding of diverse cultures while they learn more about themselves and their own culture. 

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Topics: Colorado high school, Student travelers, boarding school with international travel program, Service learning, life beyond college, college prep

Take Advantage!

Posted by Marta Miskolczy on Dec 15, 2016 12:58:38 PM

Steamboat Mountain School offers students opportunities to shine- both in the classroom and the out-of-doors. How to make the most out of a Steamboat Mountain School education:

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Topics: Colorado high school, Student travelers, boarding school with international travel program, outdoor education, skiing, ski/ride, out-of-doors, life beyond college, interesting careers, college prep

5 ways to get the most of out of your experience

Posted by Marta Miskolczy on Nov 18, 2016 11:46:44 AM

Steamboat Mountain School offers students opportunities to shine- both in the classroom and the out-of-doors. How to make the most out of a Steamboat Mountain School education:

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Steamboat Mountain School GIS 2016 Reflections

Posted by Marta Miskolczy on May 18, 2016 12:33:58 PM
Our GIS students are back on campus and have integrated into the daily life of a Steamboat Mountain School Student. Here are final reflections from our faculty leaders:
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Topics: Student travelers, boarding school with international travel program

Steamboat Mountain School GIS India 5/3

Posted by Marta Miskolczy on May 3, 2016 1:18:22 PM
Ethan '18, India, 4/30/2016
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Topics: India, Student travelers, boarding school with international travel program, Service learning

Steamboat Mountain School GIS Tanzania 5/2

Posted by Marta Miskolczy on May 2, 2016 4:50:06 PM
Maddie '17, Tanzania, 4/30/2016
Today we woke up near the base of Oldonyo Lengai, a striking volcano in the midst of rolling hills of Tanzania dotted with farms and Masai villages. We woke up early and had a breakfast of hot tea, crepes and eggs around six. Our campsite was in the middle of nowhere, and all we could see for miles was the vibrant green landscape interspersed with volcanic ash and rock from the most recent eruption in 2007. That morning, we prepared for what we thought was going to be a full day. We started our hike and soon found it to be way easier than originally expected. We wound through the foothills of the volcano, took in the breathtaking scenery and watched out for good footing in the crumbly volcanic rock. By the time we made it down and out of the foothills and found ourselves directly next the to volcano, we only had a short walk until our guide, who calls himself Teacher, told us that our walk was over. We stopped at the jeep road where our safari cars would pick us up around eleven and ate our lunch. This was a surprise to all of us, and many of us were confused when he said that we had made it to our destination, as we thought the hike was going to be long and grueling. After lunch, we got picked up by our safari cars and we made it to the next camp around  noon . This camp was located right next to a Masai village, and as soon as we stepped out of the car, swarms of women and children surrounded us, trying to sell us jewelry.

As we approached our campsite, it became apparent that this was definitely the nicest campsite we had been to. The showers were clean and for the most part weren't covered in insects. There was a large kitchen for the cooks, a clothes lines, a covered eating area and a place to buy soda. After a quick change of clothes and a snack, we decided to hike up to the nearby waterfall. The hike wasn't far, but it was beautiful and involved many river crossings. We were pretty much soaked by the time we made it to the waterfall itself. After not having showers for almost a week, swimming in the river made me feel like a new person. By the time we made it back to our campsite, it was only about  two thirty  in the afternoon, which left a lot of time for showers and much needed rest.

This being my second time in Tanzania within the past year, I came into this trip thinking I already had an understanding of the country and its dynamic culture. I should have guessed that this trip was going to wildly shift my understanding of Tanzania and its culture. Traveling with my school and on a GIS trip always gives me a different perspective of any place I have gone before. The connections that I have made with the people we have met along the way have deeply impacted me. Even though this is my fourth foreign trip, I am still always learning things about traveling. Every experience that I have while traveling is so valuable and something that I can take with me when I come back home, and I am so lucky to spend my last GIS trip in Tanzania.

Alia '17, Tanzania, 4/20/2016
I feel like time here is non-existent, as if time weren't a part of the equation of the everyday life. I usually look ahead and plan my future, but this trip has made me live in the moment more often. We have experienced so many different environments, ranging from the sandy shores of Lake Victoria, to the lion-filled Savannah, to the beautifully verdant waterfalls. The views take my breath away. The most important lesson I have learned is to embrace inter-connectedness. It is crucial we respect the campsite,    respect the lions while we're looking at them so close, leave no trace, and be aware of whatever is surrounding us. Coming here and not being able to speak Swahili opened the opportunity to communicate, not through language but through love, which they understood. Our guides are some of the most caring, compassionate, and genuinely interesting men I have ever met. The stereotype that all there is in Africa is hungry children is broken within my eyes. I observed when the Hadzabe hunted birds. I was with Alex the caring and attentive Masai that lead a 7 mile journey. I was in front of Lake Natron, which seemed so close yet so far. I was present, just  watching everything; I stepped back and only stepped in when I needed to. (If you know me, you know that I'm always in!) I will take the ability to step back and observe with me everywhere I go. They say the world is a book, and if you don't travel you've only read a page. I have turned over to a new chapter.
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Topics: Colorado high school, Student travelers, boarding school with international travel program, Tanzania, Safari

Steamboat Mountain School GIS Vietnam/Cambodia 5/3

Posted by Marta Miskolczy on May 2, 2016 4:40:11 PM
Colton '18, Vietnam and Cambodia, 5/1/2016
Today we visited a school in Siem Reap, run by PSE, and painted a mural on one of their interior walls. In the morning, half of the group worked on sketching things out while the other half played with the young children there. In the afternoon, everyone (including some of the kids there) helped to finish the painting.  Some of the kids also played tag with us in the afternoon until we were worn down. Finally, we finished things up and said our goodbyes.
In the evening, after a great dinner, we went to a free concert given by Beat Richner, a Swiss doctor who helped create and run five hospitals in Cambodia that are completely free for children. Dr. Richner was an excellent cellist, and we saw a film aobut what motivates him to do his amazing work. In the end, we all donated a little to help hom and all the local doctors and staff he has helped to train. Visit  www.beat-richner.ch to read more about him.
              
Silas '18, Vietnam and Cambodia, 4/27/2016
Today we visited the S-21 prison camp and the Killing Fields in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Even before we left Colorado, I knew this would be a very difficult experience. For me, the experience wasn't entirely new, as I have been to the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. However, the prison camp and Killing Fields, in many ways, were even more raw experiences. The many images of victims (without their stories) made it easy to imagine yourself or someone you know in that situation, making the experience extremely powerful. It is a memory one cannot forget.
 
Pablo '19, Vietnam and Cambodia, 5/1/2016
Angkor Wat
Today we had an early departure so we could bike among the temples. The jungle temples we visited were filled with wonder and mystery. After lunch and a midday rest, we returned to the huge primary temple of Angor Wat. We learned how it was part of an entire city constructed in the twelfth century with amazing art and architecture containing elements of both Hinduism and Buddhism. Our only disappointment was that we could not explore longer, as we were ushered out with the setting of the sun.
The Vietnam / Cambodia group just finished up working at a school for underpriviledged children. They also planted over 50 mango trees which will bear fruit in only 3 years! 
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Topics: Student travelers, vietnam, Cambodia, boarding school with international travel program